Reviewed by:
Rating:
3
On August 31, 2007
Last modified:October 5, 2017

Summary:

Overall, I enjoyed the Halloween “reimagining.” Not as much as the original, but it’s a solid remake and worthy addition to horror history. Let’s just hope Zombie doesn’t plan on redoing the remainder of the franchise’s seven sequels.

3 out of 5.

Since Rob Zombie branched out from his heavy metal lifestyle into the world of film, he has publicly stated his love for the horror genre. He even directed two entries of his own, House of 1000 Corpses and Devil’s Rejects. Now Zombie is showing his respect for horror by remaking it’s most classic member, Halloween. But in his own way, of course.

Rob Zombie

From the opening credits, Zombie introduces the backstory of Michael Myers, something that was never shown in the 1978 version. Michael is a noticeably troubled 10 year old, stalking around in a clown mask and spending his free time killing small animals. Around him questionable role models scream obscenities at each other. But that doesn’t last long.

Hopped up on candy corns, Michael systematically murders three people, each with a unique and gruesome method. I was a little skeptical of the pudgy preteen at first, but he delivers some absolutely brutal death blows. And once he dons the famous mask, you forget the kid isn’t old enough to see his own movie.

As Myers is being hauled away to a mental institution, a news reporter says, the deaths are “more horrific than any horror movie Hollywood can imagine.” Apparently not.

The original was made for an estimated $325,000. I have a feeling that much was budgeted for the blood in this version. Every murder is a gory mess and there are several aftermath shots of just pure carnage.

Perhaps too much time (over a half hour) is spent setting up the young Myers (Daeg Faerch), but I enjoyed this departure from the original. Though the constant presence of paper mache faces annoyed me a bit until the grown up Myers (Tyler Mane) busted out of the institution and found his trusty white mask. Then it was time to hunt some babysitters.

Myers lurks in the shadows watching Laurie (Scout Taylor-Compton) hang out with her gal pals. Sometimes he even stands in the schoolyard or the middle of the street, wearing the creepy mask. The neighborhood watch really dropped the ball on this one.

Dr. Loomis (Malcolm McDowell) searches for the escaped psychopath, but not before Myers racks up a sizable body count, complete with topless women.

Zombie’s background in music comes in handy, and he’s able to load the soundtrack with enough eerie music to heighten the mood to a steady uneasiness even when there’s no slashing going on. He did, however, keep the classic piano theme from the original.

Overall, I enjoyed the Halloween “reimagining.” Not as much as the original, but it’s a solid remake and worthy addition to horror history. Let’s just hope Zombie doesn’t plan on redoing the remainder of the franchise’s seven sequels. 3 out of 5.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *